Wood Badge Logo

Course Director: Bob Lincavicks

August 21-22-23 and September 12-13 at Camp Sequassen

What is Wood Badge?

Simply stated, Wood Badge is advanced leadership training for adult scout leaders.

Baden-Powell took the first steps in training Scouting’s adult leaders by organizing a series of lectures. The first Wood Badge training was held in 1919 at Gilwell Park, near London. Since then, Wood Badge has continued to evolve to meet Scouting’s needs. Wood Badge focuses on preparing adult leaders to deliver the mission of Scouting.

By attending this Wood Badge training program, you will:

  • Learn contemporary leadership concepts and discover how these apply to our value-based program
  • Understand Scouting as a family of interrelated programs providing age appropriate activities for youth
  • Revitalize your commitment to Scouting, sharing in an inspirational experience

What others are saying:

Sabina's Story

“The staff is very upbeat and is united in purpose. Not very often in the real world do you have so many individuals in one place who really want to help others without secondary gain. This was refreshing.” – Steve Cousins, N2-72-17 Participant

“Compelling, creative program and excellent delivery” – Jacob Cedusky, N2-72-17 Participant

“I had no idea how much of the stuff I needed to learn to run my troop in a fun and better way was included in this course. It was exactly what I needed as a Scoutmaster, and I wish I had this knowledge two years ago.” – Thane Grauel, N2-72-17 Participant

Wood Badge Themes:

  • Living the Values
  • Growing
  • Connecting
  • Guiding
  • Empowering

Wood Badge Presentation:

Wood Badge is presented in two phases. The first part of the program is the practical phase. This consists of five days over two weekends (all day Friday, Saturday & Sunday of the first weekend, and all day Saturday and Sunday of the second weekend) at camp plus two patrol meetings between the weekends. The second part of the program, the application phase, occurs after the completion of the two weekends and consists of applying the skills you learn at Wood Badge to your position in Scouting. This phase is also referred to as “working your ticket.”

Here is some information for Participants after the completion of the Wood Badge Course.

What Happens When Life Gets in the Way of Scouting?

First, remember that you can change one or more of your ticket goals if necessary. The most common reason for that is that your Scouting position changes. Additionally, sometimes a ticket goal involves more time than it originally seemed, or the goal is no longer necessary, or final approval to complete the goal is taking too long. No matter the cause, if you need or want to change your ticket item(s), contact your Troop Guide ASAP. Your Troop Guide will ask you to submit a revised write-up, complete with “who, what, where…” as well as SMART. Please remember: a change in one or more ticket goals does not change the completion time (a maximum of 18 months after completion of the last day of the Wood Badge Course).

Can I get an extension to the 18-month period?

The Course Director has limited authority to grant an extension to the original 18-month period, for extenuating circumstances. Contact your Troop Guide ASAP if an extension is required.

What if you can’t communicate with your Troop Guide? What if he or she fell off the face of the earth?

Sometimes that happens, and it’s not a problem. Well, not for you, though things may be awkward for the Troop Guide who fell off the face of the earth. Anyway, contact your Course Director, who will assign you another Troop Guide. If you are unable to reach your Course Director, contact the Council Training Chair.

If you move out of the geographic area of the Council before competing your Ticket, your Course Director will work with the Training Chair of your new council to make sure you can still complete your Ticket and receive your beads. Work with your Troop Guide.

How Do I Get My Beads?

When you have determined that you are finished working your Wood Badge Ticket, contact your Troop Guide. Your Troop Guide will talk with you a bit about your Ticket. When you and your Troop Guide agree that you’re done, contact your Course Director to arrange for a Beading Ceremony. It is up to you to arrange a time and place, and to let the Course Director know (well in advance, please). The presentation can be most anything but do not request the Course Director to just mail the beads to you. The ceremony can be at any suitable event – a Pack meeting, Troop Court of Honor, Camporee, District or Council Training Event, District Roundtable, or even a simple campfire. It is up to you to invite family, friends, other members of your Wood Badge Patrol, etc. Your Course Director will also notify other staff members of your ceremony, who will attend as they are able.

Wearing the Wood Badge Beads

After your beads are presented, you wear them only with the field uniform – the main “official” uniform, with the khaki or yellow or green shirt. You do not wear your beads with activity uniforms, t-shirts, or any civilian wear.  (If you are wearing the beads and then decide to take off the field uniform shirt and just wear a t-shirt, you can tuck the beads under the t-shirt so they don’t show but they also don’t get lost.)

You may wear your beads with the Gilwell neckerchief (dove-grey with MacLaren tartan patch) and Turk’s head knot woggle, or with your troop/district/OA neckerchief and slide, or you may wear your beads with no neckerchief.  For formal events, you would typically wear your beads with the Gilwell neckerchief and woggle.

The rules for wearing the Gilwell neckerchief and woggle are more limited. They stay together. You don’t wear the Gilwell neckerchief with a different slide, and you don’t wear the woggle with a different neckerchief.  And if you wear them, you must wear your beads, too.

Wood Badge beads are always worn on a leather thong which is tied in an overhand knot. When worn with a neckerchief, the thong is placed under the shirt collar, followed by the neckerchief; thus the thong is worn under the neckerchief. The beads are then brought in front of the neckerchief and displayed below the woggle. Some Scouters thread the thong through the woggle before placing around the neck. If you cross the beads under the woggle and pull the ends of the neckerchief through loop formed, then the beads will appear immediately under the woggle without shifting.

That’s Not a Word We Use

Wood Badge is (are) TWO words. Both words are capitalized.

The Gilwell Song

The Gilwell Song is always sung with gusto if not much harmony, and always in the same order by patrol, with Beavers first (then Bob White – Eagle – Fox – Owl – Bear – Buffalo – Antelope [and Staff]). Besides the typical eight Wood Badge patrols, you may sometimes have Wood Badgers who were Wolves, Ravens, Explorers, or others. The verse for Explorer Wood Badge is quite different – see your songbook.  Typically members of a patrol will link arms (around shoulders) while singing their verse, then join the other patrols, so that at the end everyone is together.  We do not change the song, and we don’t dance nor clap nor stamp our feet. That’s tempting sometimes, but we don’t.  If there are people present who have not gone to Wood Badge, then the senior patrol leader or other appropriate Scouter might invite them to stand and sing with a friend or family member, or to be inside the circle.

In the Gilwell Song, remember AND. We sing “I used to be a Squirrel [or whatever] AND a good old Squirrel, too.”  Got it?  “And.”

Wood Badge is Not the End

“The Gilwell scarf does not entitle you to consider yourself as a thing apart. Your Troop or District must as much as ever command your first allegiance.” ~ Baden-Powell, in the Headquarters Gazette of October 1923.

Wood Badge is for the rest of your life. Work your Ticket right away, of course. Try to finish within six months or maybe nine. You are allowed to take up to 18 months, but try not to take that long. You know how Scouts have to get Eagle by age 18? Well, you have to finish your Ticket by 18 (months).

Do it;

Do it right;

Do it right now.

 

Contact your Troop Guide if you have problems, need to change a Ticket goal, or just want to chat.

The lessons you learn at Wood Badge never end. They are with you for the rest of your life.

Random Bits of Wisdom

“Don’t let the technical outweigh the moral. Field efficiency, backwoodsmanship,  camping, hiking, good turns, jamboree comradeship are all means, not the end. The end is character – character with a purpose.”

~ Baden-Powell, The Scouter magazine, March 1939

“Stick to your Scout Promise always – even after you have ceased to be a boy – and God help you to do it.“

~ Last words of Baden-Powell’s Last Message to Scouts

Plan A is a myth.

~ Anon

“I will seek to preserve a cheerful spirit even in the midst of irksome tasks and weighty responsibilities.”

~ From the Order of the Arrow Obligation

“The Scout Law is the foundation on which the whole of Scout training rests.”

~ Baden-Powell, Aids to Scoutmastership, World Brotherhood edition, 1944

“True leadership is the art of changing a group from what is into what it ought to be.”

~ Jan Greene

“It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants. What are we industrious about?”

~ Henry David Thoreau

“Leadership is not about making yourself more powerful. It’s about making people around you more powerful.”

~ Betty Linton

“It is a commonly quoted saying that ‘Only those can lead who have first learned to obey.’ Yes, but like many truisms it has its limits. I prefer also as a leader the man who has learned to lead.”

~ Baden-Powell, Headquarters Gazette,  June 1918

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only that that ever has.”

~ Margaret Mead

“The Golden Rule is of no use to you whatever unless you realize it is YOUR move.”

~ Dr. Frank Crane

“If you don’t know where you’re going, you won’t know when you get there.”

~ Variously: Yogi Berra, Lewis Carroll, Cheshire Cat

You have to start from where you are.

~ Anon

I shall be telling this with a sigh, ages and ages hence;

two roads diverged in a wood and I – I took the one less traveled by,

and that has made all the difference.

~ Robert Frost, from The Road Not Taken

 

What is a Ticket?

The primary purpose of the Wood Badge experience is to strengthen Scouting in our units, districts, and local councils.  During the course, the Wood Badge Staff will help you set some personal goals, things you would like to accomplish in your Pack, Troop, Crew or your District. These goals are referred to as the Wood Badge “Ticket”. The Ticket represents your commitment to complete a set of five personal goals, which you establish, related to your Scouting position. These goals should be designed to significantly strengthen the Scouting program in which you are involved. In addition, the Ticket gives you an opportunity to practice and demonstrate the leadership skills presented during the Wood Badge course. Many participants set Ticket goals that can be completed in 6 to 12 months, but you must complete your Wood Badge Ticket goals no later than 18 months after the course ends. All Ticket goals are developed with this time limit in mind.

How are Scouters Recognized?

Upon completion of your Wood Badge Ticket (your five goals), you will be presented with the Wood Badge Training Award: neckerchief, woggle, beads, and Wood Badge certificate at an appropriate ceremony. Click here for more details.

Many Scouters consider Wood Badge to be one of the highlights of their Scouting careers. Wood Badge has served as a source of training and inspiration to thousands of Scout leaders. In return, Wood Badge participants have positively influenced the lives of countless numbers of America’s youth.

Wood Badge Beads (2)

Wood Badge Woggle

Wood Badge Neckerchief

Who Should Participate?

Wood Badge is designed for Cub Scout, Scouts BSA, Venturing, Sea Scouts and Exploring Leaders at the unit level, as well as district and council leaders. The course content and leadership principles introduced during the course apply to Scouters in all leadership positions. These skills provide common a leadership foundation that is beneficial for all program areas. To attend a Wood Badge course, you must:

  • Be a registered adult member of the Boy Scouts of America. (There is no minimum tenure requirement.)
  • All adult leaders must complete Leader Specific Training for their primary registered position. Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills is required for Scoutmasters and Assistant Scoutmasters.
  • Successful completion of the BSA Annual Health and Medical Record is required for all participants (parts A, B and C). No exceptions.

What is are the Dates and Locations of the Course?

The first weekend in 2020 is August 21-22-23; the second weekend is September 12-13. The first weekend begins 7:30 AM on Friday morning; the second weekend session begins at 7:30 AM on Saturday morning, both weekends ends around 4:30 PM on Sunday. Both weekends are held at Camp Sequassen. Participation and attendance at both weekends, a total of five full days, is required for the successful completion of the Wood Badge course.

When is the deadline for registration?

In order for the Staff to be reasonably prepared for the appropriate number of participants, registrations should be received at the Council Resource Center in Milford:

  • Super Early Bird Fee before December 31, 2019: $199.00
  • Early Bird Fee on or before May 15, 2020: $220.00
  • Regular Fee after May 15 but no later than July 31, 2020: $240.00
  • Late Signup Fee after July 31 but no later than August 15, 2020: $270.00
  • Anyone requesting a Scholarship to cover Wood Badge course fees should submit their application for the course and a Scholarship Application ASAP.

Where Can We Get More Information?

We’ve developed a series of FAQs (frequently asked questions). Please look through them first.

For information on the 2020 course, contact:  

What is the purpose of Wood Badge?

The ultimate purpose of Wood Badge is to help adult leaders deliver the highest quality Scouting program to young people to help them to achieve their highest potential. It models the best techniques for developing teamwork among both young people and adults. In doing this, Wood Badge also supports Scouters who are active on adult committees, including District and Council committees. Nationally famous training professionals and volunteers updated the Wood Badge syllabus during 2000 and 2001, and again in 2017 and 2018, to provide the best methods to adult Scouters to model and teach leadership skills to others. The effectiveness of Wood Badge as a leadership development experience has been applauded by industry training professionals.

Do I need an invitation to attend Wood Badge?

No. All adult leaders who meet the qualifications (see below) are eligible to attend Wood Badge. We wish that we could personally meet and encourage every Scouter in our Council to take Wood Badge. Since this is unlikely, we are trying to reach out in as many ways as possible to introduce Wood Badge. You will find additional information on our Council website under the heading of Program > Training.

How much time will Wood Badge take?

Wood Badge is conducted over two full weekends. Thr first weekend begins at 7:30 AM on Friday morning; the second weekend begins at 7:30 AM on Saturday morning; both weekends finish around 4:30 PM on Sunday. Attendance at both weekends is required. Attendance for all fivedays is required. In addition, your working group (Patrol) will plan one or two meetings between the two weekend sessions, scheduled at your Patrol’s convenience and choice of location.

The Wood Badge curriculum has been developed in a series of building blocks with each session relating to another or building and expanding on a previous topic. Our days and nights are very full of presentations and activities and it is extremely important that participants be available to participate for all five days. There really is no way to make this experience up separately. Consequently, we ask that cell phone calls or other business or personal matters be strictly limited to periodic break times in the course schedule. There will not be time for a participant to leave the camp during the five days. Please contact the Course Director if you have any questions on this issue.

When and where is Wood Badge held?

Connecticut Yankee Council holds one Wood Badge course each year.  The first weekend in 2020 is August 21-22-23; the second weekend is September 12-13. Both weekends at held at Camp Sequassen.

How will Wood Badge help me?

Wood Badge will teach you about leadership techniques in a “living”, hands-on environment, and you will be able to apply all you learn to any Scouting role that you currently have or may have in the future. It will also be very useful in your personal and business life. Since these skills can be practiced in a variety of situations, Wood Badge is beneficial for all adults involved in Scouting, including Cub Scouts, Scouts BSA, Venturing, Exploring, Commissioner Service, as well as on District and Council committees.

You will develop a “Ticket”, which is a written agreement outlining how you will apply your newly learned skills as you continue your involvement in Scouting. Development of your Ticket is an exercise in goal-setting and includes creating a personal vision and mission statement and outlining your individual steps to personal success. You will work with a member of the Wood Badge course staff who will assist you in the development of your Ticket and will be available to you as you work through and complete your Ticket goals.

How do I earn my beads?

After participating in all five days of both weekends, you will have completed the “practical” phase of Wood Badge training. During these two weekends, and the time between them, you will create your own set of personal goals – your Wood Badge Ticket – as mentioned above.

You’ve probably seen other Scouters wearing their Wood Badge beads. When you successfully complete your Ticket (the application phase of Wood Badge), members of your Wood Badge staff will present you with your Wood Badge beads, tan neckerchief with the MacLaren tartan “patch”, a leather woggle (neckerchief slide) and a Wood Badge completion certificate. These are worldwide symbols that a Scouter has completed Wood Badge training. More information here.

Will I have fun?

Absolutely! At Wood Badge, fun and learning go hand-in hand!

What are the qualifications needed to attend Wood Badge?

Wood Badge for adult Scouters at ALL levels and programs: Cub Scouting, Scouts BSA, Venturing, Sea Scouting and Exploring, as well as District and Council members. Here are the qualifications:

  • Be a registered adult member of the Boy Scouts of America or a registered Venturer at least 18 years of age
  • Complete youth protection training and basic training courses for your primary Scouting position
  • Complete the outdoor skills training program appropriate to your Scouting position
  • Be capable of functioning safely in an outdoor environment
  • Have your physician authorize your BSA Annual Health and Medical Record (complete parts A, B and C).

Where in camp will I be?

For weekend 1, the majority of our activities will be located in the central part of the Camp, including the Dining Hall and several of the campsites in the same area. We will have some activities that will occur farther away. For the second weekend, we will have activities in both the south and north part of the camp.

If you have any concerns about your ability to get around camp (bad knee, bad back, bad ankle – you get the point), please let us know. We will do everything within our power to make camp fully accessible to you. If you have any other health concerns (CPAP, special dietary concerns, etc), please let us know. Again, we will try our very best to accommodate you.

What will I eat?

You will enjoy delicious meals prepared for you by the Wood Badge staff on the first weekend and served in the Camp Dining Hall. The second weekend, your Patrol will prepare some meals in your campsite and return the favor by hosting Wood Badge staff members at mealtime.

If you have any dietary restrictions for religious, medical, or health reasons, please advise the Wood Badge Course Director or Staff Adviser before the first weekend and we will do our best to accommodate your needs.

What do I wear?

You are expected to wear a full Scouting uniform including shirt, trousers or shorts, socks and belt during most of the course. You should arrive in full uniform on our first Friday morning as you will have little time to change into it after you arrive. You will be provided a Wood Badge baseball style cap to wear as a part of your uniform for the course as well as a course neckerchief. There will be some opportunities to change into an Activity uniform during the course. Please be mindful to bring only Scouting appropriate activity clothing. A complete packing list will be provided to you after you register for the course.

What is the weather like?

For the first weekend at Camp Sequassen, based on historical averages, you can expect the weather to be mostly sunny, with a 30% chance of rain. High temperatures average 75-85 degrees, with overnight lows 55-65 degrees. The record high temperature is 93 and the record low is 45. For the second weekend, you can expect the weather to be partly cloudy to mostly sunny, with a 30% chance of rain. High temperatures average 65-75 degrees, with overnight lows 45-55 degrees. The record high temperature is 90 and the record low is 30.

When it comes to weather, the Scout Motto is in full force: Be Prepared.

What other things will I need to bring?

You will need to bring a desire to learn, an ability to have fun and get along with others who share your belief in Scouting, and a commitment to taking what you learn back to apply to your Scouting role and into your everyday life.

You will need whatever gear and clothing that you might normally need to spend these weekends outdoors. Personal tents will not be needed on the first weekend, as we will be using camp sites with lean-tos. Cooking equipment will also not be needed for the first weekend, as the staff will provide all meals in the dining hall. Personal tents and camping and cooking equipment will be needed for the second weekend. A more detailed packing list will be provided after you have registered for the Wood Badge course. Additionally, during the first weekend, your patrol members will discuss the equipment needs for the second weekend, and can combine resources to ensure everyone has what they need.

How do I register?

Visit the Council website where you can register online. You can also obtain a registration form at the Council Resource Center, from your District Executive, or the Wood Badge Staff Adviser, Joe Andreo.

When is the deadline for registration?

In order for the Staff to be reasonably prepared for the appropriate number of participants, registrations should be received at the Council Resource Center in Milford:

  • Super Early Bird Fee before December 31, 2019: $199.00
  • Early Bird Fee on or before May 15, 2020: $220.00
  • Regular Fee after May 15 but no later than July 31, 2020: $240.00
  • Late Signup Fee after July 31 but no later than August 15, 2020: $270.00

Who can I contact if I have more questions?

Is financial assistance available if I need it?

YES. We want Wood Badge training to be available to all Scouters. Often, course fees are partially or fully funded by the unit that you serve, or the unit’s chartered organization. We strongly recommend contacting your Unit Committee for help with funding.

Thanks to contributions from fellow Wood Badgers, the Connecticut Yankee Council has scholarship funds available, based on need. To submit a CONFIDENTIAL scholarship application, please contact Joe Andreo, Staff Adviser, at joseph.andreo@scouting.org

Additionally, both the AFL-CIO and the VFW have scholarship programs. Information for these programs can be found at:

I am only in my first year as a Scout Leader and I was not a Scout as a youth. Is my lack of experience a concern?

Absolutely not! Wood Badge is about leadership training. It is not a course in Scout skills. Wood Badge will help you understand what Scouting is about and how you can make a real difference by providing you with many important and useful leadership tools. These tools will help you to be more effective as a leader and as a team member.

I don’t have strong outdoor or camping skills as they are not required for my Scouting position. Will this be a problem?

No. While outdoor skills are helpful, they are not essential for taking Wood Badge. Whenever outdoor skills are needed during the course, there will be other Scouters who can and will share their knowledge with you.

I know what my Wood Badge Ticket will be. Can I start now?

Respectfully, you do not know what your Ticket will be until you attend the course. You will be guided to write a meaningful, effective Ticket which is a major element of the Wood Badge course because it will be greatly affected by what you hear, learn and experience while you are attending the two weekends. Depending on what you plan to do as a result of what you learn, you may need to coordinate your plans with other Scouters, whether they are in your units or on committees that you serve. Until your Wood Badge Ticket is written (during the course) and agreed to with your Troop Guide, you can take no credit for work “towards your Ticket” prior to the practical phase being completed. Please note: there is plenty of inaccurate information on the internet (does that surprise anyone??) regarding the Wood Badge Ticket. Official Ticket guidelines do change from year to year, to be more responsive to the needs of Scouting. Also, some Councils have local “traditions” regarding Tickets that may be inappropriate.

So…..please wait until you attend the course to learn about the “correct” way of developing an effective Wood Badge Ticket

Can I miss any of the scheduled Wood Badge training dates or times?

No. Because there is so much information being presented in such a short period of time, and, because each session and topic builds on previous material presented, sequentially; attendance at each session during each of the five days over the two weekends is mandatory. There are no exceptions.

I took Wood Badge prior to 2001. Can I take Wood Badge again?

Yes! Wood Badge contains new and updated material and activities that can enrich your role in Scouting. It may give you new perspectives and skills that you may use. If you are interested, please contact the Wood Badge Course Director.

I took Wood Badge after 2001 but never completed my ticket. Can I take Wood Badge again?

Yes! We welcome the opportunity for you to take Wood Badge again, establish new ticket goals, and complete your ticket. If you are interested, please contact the Wood Badge Course Director.

Should I prepare anything before the course?

In addition to the application and payment, please have a BSA Annual Health and Medical Record signed by your physician and submit it to Joe Andreo, Staff Advisor, at joseph.andreo@scouting.org

You need to have a clear understanding of your role(s) in Scouting so that you can identify goals where your newly learned skills (and the ones you already have) can be best utilized.

You also need to complete a few Pre-Course Questions. This should help to make the materials that you learn more meaningful to you. Please complete the Personal Resource Questionnaire as well. Both of these items will be sent to you prior to the start of the course.

 

Many Scouters consider Wood Badge to be a peak experience in their Scouting lives. It has served as a source of training and inspiration to many thousands. In return, Wood Badge participants have positively affected the lives of millions of Scouts.

 

FAQs

What is the purpose of Wood Badge?

The ultimate purpose of Wood Badge is to help adult leaders deliver the highest quality Scouting program to young people to help them to achieve their highest potential. It models the best techniques for developing teamwork among both young people and adults. In doing this, Wood Badge also supports Scouters who are active on adult committees, including District and Council committees. Nationally famous training professionals and volunteers updated the Wood Badge syllabus during 2000 and 2001, and again in 2017 and 2018, to provide the best methods to adult Scouters to model and teach leadership skills to others. The effectiveness of Wood Badge as a leadership development experience has been applauded by industry training professionals.

Do I need an invitation to attend Wood Badge?

No. All adult leaders who meet the qualifications (see below) are eligible to attend Wood Badge. We wish that we could personally meet and encourage every Scouter in our Council to take Wood Badge. Since this is unlikely, we are trying to reach out in as many ways as possible to introduce Wood Badge. You will find additional information on our Council website under the heading of Program > Training.

How much time will Wood Badge take?

Wood Badge is conducted over two full weekends. Thr first weekend begins at 7:30 AM on Friday morning; the second weekend begins at 7:30 AM on Saturday morning; both weekends finish around 4:30 PM on Sunday. Attendance at both weekends is required. Attendance for all fivedays is required. In addition, your working group (Patrol) will plan one or two meetings between the two weekend sessions, scheduled at your Patrol’s convenience and choice of location.

The Wood Badge curriculum has been developed in a series of building blocks with each session relating to another or building and expanding on a previous topic. Our days and nights are very full of presentations and activities and it is extremely important that participants be available to participate for all five days. There really is no way to make this experience up separately. Consequently, we ask that cell phone calls or other business or personal matters be strictly limited to periodic break times in the course schedule. There will not be time for a participant to leave the camp during the five days. Please contact the Course Director if you have any questions on this issue.

When and where is Wood Badge held?

Connecticut Yankee Council holds one Wood Badge course each year.  The first weekend in 2020 is August 21-22-23; the second weekend is September 12-13. Both weekends at held at Camp Sequassen.

How will Wood Badge help me?

Wood Badge will teach you about leadership techniques in a “living”, hands-on environment, and you will be able to apply all you learn to any Scouting role that you currently have or may have in the future. It will also be very useful in your personal and business life. Since these skills can be practiced in a variety of situations, Wood Badge is beneficial for all adults involved in Scouting, including Cub Scouts, Scouts BSA, Venturing, Exploring, Commissioner Service, as well as on District and Council committees.

You will develop a “Ticket”, which is a written agreement outlining how you will apply your newly learned skills as you continue your involvement in Scouting. Development of your Ticket is an exercise in goal-setting and includes creating a personal vision and mission statement and outlining your individual steps to personal success. You will work with a member of the Wood Badge course staff who will assist you in the development of your Ticket and will be available to you as you work through and complete your Ticket goals.

How do I earn my beads?

After participating in all five days of both weekends, you will have completed the “practical” phase of Wood Badge training. During these two weekends, and the time between them, you will create your own set of personal goals – your Wood Badge Ticket – as mentioned above.

You’ve probably seen other Scouters wearing their Wood Badge beads. When you successfully complete your Ticket (the application phase of Wood Badge), members of your Wood Badge staff will present you with your Wood Badge beads, tan neckerchief with the MacLaren tartan “patch”, a leather woggle (neckerchief slide) and a Wood Badge completion certificate. These are worldwide symbols that a Scouter has completed Wood Badge training. More information here.

Will I have fun?

Absolutely! At Wood Badge, fun and learning go hand-in hand!

What are the qualifications needed to attend Wood Badge?

Wood Badge for adult Scouters at ALL levels and programs: Cub Scouting, Scouts BSA, Venturing, Sea Scouting and Exploring, as well as District and Council members. Here are the qualifications:

  • Be a registered adult member of the Boy Scouts of America or a registered Venturer at least 18 years of age
  • Complete youth protection training and basic training courses for your primary Scouting position
  • Complete the outdoor skills training program appropriate to your Scouting position
  • Be capable of functioning safely in an outdoor environment
  • Have your physician authorize your BSA Annual Health and Medical Record (complete parts A, B and C).

Where in camp will I be?

For weekend 1, the majority of our activities will be located in the central part of the Camp, including the Dining Hall and several of the campsites in the same area. We will have some activities that will occur farther away. For the second weekend, we will have activities in both the south and north part of the camp.

If you have any concerns about your ability to get around camp (bad knee, bad back, bad ankle – you get the point), please let us know. We will do everything within our power to make camp fully accessible to you. If you have any other health concerns (CPAP, special dietary concerns, etc), please let us know. Again, we will try our very best to accommodate you.

What will I eat?

You will enjoy delicious meals prepared for you by the Wood Badge staff on the first weekend and served in the Camp Dining Hall. The second weekend, your Patrol will prepare some meals in your campsite and return the favor by hosting Wood Badge staff members at mealtime.

If you have any dietary restrictions for religious, medical, or health reasons, please advise the Wood Badge Course Director or Staff Adviser before the first weekend and we will do our best to accommodate your needs.

What do I wear?

You are expected to wear a full Scouting uniform including shirt, trousers or shorts, socks and belt during most of the course. You should arrive in full uniform on our first Friday morning as you will have little time to change into it after you arrive. You will be provided a Wood Badge baseball style cap to wear as a part of your uniform for the course as well as a course neckerchief. There will be some opportunities to change into an Activity uniform during the course. Please be mindful to bring only Scouting appropriate activity clothing. A complete packing list will be provided to you after you register for the course.

What is the weather like?

For the first weekend at Camp Sequassen, based on historical averages, you can expect the weather to be mostly sunny, with a 30% chance of rain. High temperatures average 75-85 degrees, with overnight lows 55-65 degrees. The record high temperature is 93 and the record low is 45. For the second weekend, you can expect the weather to be partly cloudy to mostly sunny, with a 30% chance of rain. High temperatures average 65-75 degrees, with overnight lows 45-55 degrees. The record high temperature is 90 and the record low is 30.

When it comes to weather, the Scout Motto is in full force: Be Prepared.

What other things will I need to bring?

You will need to bring a desire to learn, an ability to have fun and get along with others who share your belief in Scouting, and a commitment to taking what you learn back to apply to your Scouting role and into your everyday life.

You will need whatever gear and clothing that you might normally need to spend these weekends outdoors. Personal tents will not be needed on the first weekend, as we will be using camp sites with lean-tos. Cooking equipment will also not be needed for the first weekend, as the staff will provide all meals in the dining hall. Personal tents and camping and cooking equipment will be needed for the second weekend. A more detailed packing list will be provided after you have registered for the Wood Badge course. Additionally, during the first weekend, your patrol members will discuss the equipment needs for the second weekend, and can combine resources to ensure everyone has what they need.

How do I register?

Visit the Council website where you can register online. You can also obtain a registration form at the Council Resource Center, from your District Executive, or the Wood Badge Staff Adviser, Joe Andreo.

When is the deadline for registration?

In order for the Staff to be reasonably prepared for the appropriate number of participants, registrations should be received at the Council Resource Center in Milford:

  • Super Early Bird Fee before December 31, 2019: $199.00
  • Early Bird Fee on or before May 15, 2020: $220.00
  • Regular Fee after May 15 but no later than July 31, 2020: $240.00
  • Late Signup Fee after July 31 but no later than August 15, 2020: $270.00

Who can I contact if I have more questions?

Is financial assistance available if I need it?

YES. We want Wood Badge training to be available to all Scouters. Often, course fees are partially or fully funded by the unit that you serve, or the unit’s chartered organization. We strongly recommend contacting your Unit Committee for help with funding.

Thanks to contributions from fellow Wood Badgers, the Connecticut Yankee Council has scholarship funds available, based on need. To submit a CONFIDENTIAL scholarship application, please contact Joe Andreo, Staff Adviser, at joseph.andreo@scouting.org

Additionally, both the AFL-CIO and the VFW have scholarship programs. Information for these programs can be found at:

I am only in my first year as a Scout Leader and I was not a Scout as a youth. Is my lack of experience a concern?

Absolutely not! Wood Badge is about leadership training. It is not a course in Scout skills. Wood Badge will help you understand what Scouting is about and how you can make a real difference by providing you with many important and useful leadership tools. These tools will help you to be more effective as a leader and as a team member.

I don’t have strong outdoor or camping skills as they are not required for my Scouting position. Will this be a problem?

No. While outdoor skills are helpful, they are not essential for taking Wood Badge. Whenever outdoor skills are needed during the course, there will be other Scouters who can and will share their knowledge with you.

I know what my Wood Badge Ticket will be. Can I start now?

Respectfully, you do not know what your Ticket will be until you attend the course. You will be guided to write a meaningful, effective Ticket which is a major element of the Wood Badge course because it will be greatly affected by what you hear, learn and experience while you are attending the two weekends. Depending on what you plan to do as a result of what you learn, you may need to coordinate your plans with other Scouters, whether they are in your units or on committees that you serve. Until your Wood Badge Ticket is written (during the course) and agreed to with your Troop Guide, you can take no credit for work “towards your Ticket” prior to the practical phase being completed. Please note: there is plenty of inaccurate information on the internet (does that surprise anyone??) regarding the Wood Badge Ticket. Official Ticket guidelines do change from year to year, to be more responsive to the needs of Scouting. Also, some Councils have local “traditions” regarding Tickets that may be inappropriate.

So…..please wait until you attend the course to learn about the “correct” way of developing an effective Wood Badge Ticket

Can I miss any of the scheduled Wood Badge training dates or times?

No. Because there is so much information being presented in such a short period of time, and, because each session and topic builds on previous material presented, sequentially; attendance at each session during each of the five days over the two weekends is mandatory. There are no exceptions.

I took Wood Badge prior to 2001. Can I take Wood Badge again?

Yes! Wood Badge contains new and updated material and activities that can enrich your role in Scouting. It may give you new perspectives and skills that you may use. If you are interested, please contact the Wood Badge Course Director.

I took Wood Badge after 2001 but never completed my ticket. Can I take Wood Badge again?

Yes! We welcome the opportunity for you to take Wood Badge again, establish new ticket goals, and complete your ticket. If you are interested, please contact the Wood Badge Course Director.

Should I prepare anything before the course?

In addition to the application and payment, please have a BSA Annual Health and Medical Record signed by your physician and submit it to Joe Andreo, Staff Advisor, at joseph.andreo@scouting.org

You need to have a clear understanding of your role(s) in Scouting so that you can identify goals where your newly learned skills (and the ones you already have) can be best utilized.

You also need to complete a few Pre-Course Questions. This should help to make the materials that you learn more meaningful to you. Please complete the Personal Resource Questionnaire as well. Both of these items will be sent to you prior to the start of the course.

 

Many Scouters consider Wood Badge to be a peak experience in their Scouting lives. It has served as a source of training and inspiration to many thousands. In return, Wood Badge participants have positively affected the lives of millions of Scouts.

 

After the Course is Over

A Brief History of Baden-Powell

The name Baden-Powell is known and respected throughout the world as that of a man who, in his 83 years, devoted himself to the service of his country and his fellow men in two separate and complete lives, one as a soldier fighting for his country, and the other as a worker for peace through the brotherhood of the Scout Movement.

Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell was born at 6 Stanhope Street (now 11 Stanhope Terrace), Paddington, London on February 22, 1857. He was the sixth son and the eighth of ten children of the Reverend Baden-Powell, a Professor at Oxford University. The names Robert Stephenson were those of his Godfather, the son of George Stephenson, the railway pioneer.

His father died when B.-P. was only three years old and the family were left none too well off. B.-P. was given his first lessons by his mother and later attended Rose Hill School, Tunbridge Wells, where he BPgained a scholarship for admittance to Charterhouse School. Charterhouse School was in London when B.-P. first attended but whilst he was there it moved to Godalming, Surrey, a factor which had great influence in his later life. He was always eager to learn new skills. He played the piano and fiddle. He acted – and acted the clown too at times. He practiced bricklaying, and it was whilst a scholar at Charter house that he began to exploit his interest in the arts of Scouting and woodcraft.

Unofficially, in the woods around the school, B.-P. would stalk his Masters as well as catch and cook rabbits, being careful not to let the tell-tale smoke give his position away. His holidays were not wasted either. With his brothers he was always in search of adventure. One holiday they made a yachting expedition around the south coast of England. On another, they traced the Thames to its source by canoe. In all this, Baden-Powell was learning the arts and crafts which were to prove so useful to him professionally. B.-P. was certainly not a ‘swot’ at school, as his end of term reports revealed. One records: ‘Mathematics – has to all intents given up the study’, and another:

‘French – could do well but has become very lazy, often sleeps in school’. Nevertheless, he gained second place for cavalry in open examination for the Army and was commissioned straight into the 13th Hussars, bypassing the officer training establishments, and subsequently became their Honorary Colonel for 30 years. His Army career was outstanding from the start. With the 13th Hussars he served in India, Afghanistan and South Africa and was mentioned in dispatches for his work in Zululand. There followed three years service in Malta as Assistant Military Secretary and then he went to Ashanti, Africa, to lead the campaign against Prempeh. Success led to his being promoted to command the 5th Dragoon Guards in 1897, at the age of 40. It was to the 5th Dragoon Guards that B.-P. gave his first training in Scouting and awarded soldiers reaching certain standards a badge based on the north point of the compass. Today’s Scout Membership badge is very similar.

In 1899 came Mafeking, the most notable episode in his outstanding military career, by which he became a Major-General at the age of only 43. B.-P. became famous and the hero of every boy, although he always minimized his own part and the value of his inspiring leadership. By using boys for responsible jobs during the siege, he learned the good response youth give to a challenge. During the 217 day siege, B.-P.’s book Aids to Scouting was published and reached a far wider readership than the military one for which it was intended.  Following Mafeking, B.-P. was given the task of organizing the South African Constabulary and it was not until 1903 that he returned to England as Inspector General of Cavalry and found that his book, Aids to Scouting was being used by youth leaders and teachers all over the country. He spoke at meetings and rallies and whilst at a Boys’ Brigade gathering he was asked by its Founder, Sir William Smith, to work out a scheme for giving greater variety in the training of boys in good citizenship.

The Beginnings of the Movement

B.P. set to work rewriting Aids to Scouting, this time for a younger readership. In 1907 he held an experimental camp on Brownsea Island, Poole, Dorset, to try out his ideas. He brought together 22 boys, some from public schools and some from working class homes, and put them into camp under his leadership. The whole world now knows the results of that camp.

Scouting for Boys

Scouting for Boys was published in 1908 in six fortnightly parts at 4d a copy. Sales of the book were tremendous. Boys formed themselves into Scout Patrols to try out ideas. What had been intended as a training aid for existing organizations became the handbook of a new and, ultimately worldwide Movement. B.-P.’s great understanding of boys obviously touched something fundamental in the youth of this and other countries.

‘Scouting for Boys’ has since been translated into many different languages and dialects.

Without fuss, without ceremony and completely spontaneously, boys began to form Scout Troops all over the country. In September 1908, B.P. had set up an office to deal with the large number of enquiries which were pouring in concerning the Movement.

There is no need to describe the way in which Scouting spread throughout the British Commonwealth and to other countries until it was established in practically all parts of the free world. Even those countries where Scouting as we know it is not allowed to exist readily, admit that they used its methods for their own youth training.

As Inspector-General of Cavalry, B.P. considered that he had reached the pinnacle of his career. The baton of Field Marshal was within his grasp but he retired from the Army in 1910 at the age of 53, on the advice of His Majesty King Edward VII, who suggested that he would do more valuable service for his country within the Boy Scout Movement (now Scout Movement) than anyone could hope to do as a soldier!

So all his enthusiasm and energy was now directed to the development of Scouting and its sister Movement, Guiding. He traveled to all parts of the world, wherever he was most needed, to encourage their growth and give them the inspiration that he alone could give.

In 1912, he married Olave Soames who was his constant help and companion in all this work and by whom he had three children (Peter, Heather and Betty). Olave, Lady Baden-Powell, until she died in 1977, was known throughout the world as World Chief Guide.

Chief Scout of the World

The first international Scout Jamboree took place at Olympia, London in 1920. At its closing scene, B.-P. was unanimously acclaimed as Chief Scout of the World. Successive international gatherings, whether of Scouts or Rovers (now called Venture Scouts) or of Scouters, proved that this was not an honorary title, but that he was truly regarded by them all as their Chief. The shouts that heralded his arrival, and the silence that fell when he raised his hand, proved beyond any doubt that he had captured the hearts and imaginations of his followers in whatever country they owed allegiance.

At the 3rd World Jamboree, held in Arrowe Park, Birkenhead, to celebrate the 21st Anniversary of the publication of Scouting for Boys, the Prince of Wales announced that B.P. had been created a Peer. He took the title of Lord Baden-Powell of Gilwell – Gilwell Park being the International Training Centre for Scout Leaders.

Scouting was not B.P.’s only interest, for excelled at pig-sticking and fishing, and favored polo and big game hunting. He was also a very good black & white and watercolor artist and took an interest in photography and sculpture. In 1907, he exhibited a bust of John Smith, the colonial pioneer, at the Royal Academy.

B.P. wrote no less than 32 books, the earning from which helped to pay for his Scouting travels. As with all his successors, he received no salary as Chief Scout. He received honorary degrees from Edinburgh, Toronto, Montreal, Oxford, Liverpool and Cambridge Universities. He also received Freedoms of the cities of London, Guildford, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Bangor, Cardiff, Hawick, Kingston-on- Thames, Poole, Blandford, Canterbury and Pontefract, and of other cities in various parts of the world. In addition, 28 Foreign Orders and decorations and 19 Foreign Scout Awards were bestowed upon him. Every minute of B.-P.’s life was ‘sixty seconds worth of distance run’. Each new adventure was the subject for a book. Every happy incident or thought, every fine landscape might be the subject for a sketch. In 1938, suffering from ill-health, B.-P. returned to Africa, which had meant so much in his life, to live in semi-retirement in Nyeri, Kenya. Even here he found it difficult to curb his energies – he still produced many books and sketches.

Baden Powell Gravestone - Gone Home

On January 8, 1941, Baden-Powell died. He was 83 years of age. He is buried in a simple grave at Nyeri within sight of Mount Kenya. On his headstone are the words, ‘Robert Baden-Powell, Chief Scout of the World’ surmounted by the Boy Scout and Girl Guide Badges. His memory remains for all time in the hearts of millions of men and women, boys and girls.

It is up to those who are, or have been, Scouts or Guides to see that the two Movements he so firmly established continue for all time as living memorials to their Founder.

Baden-Powell’s Last Message

Towards the end of his life, although still in comparatively good health, he prepared a farewell message to his Scouts for publication after his death. It read:

 

Dear Scouts – if you have ever seen the play ‘Peter Pan’ you will remember how the pirate chief was always making his dying speech because he was afraid that possible, when the time came for him to die, he might not have time to get it off his chest. It is much the same with me, and so, although I am not at this moment dying, I shall be doing so one of these days and I want to send you a parting word of goodbye.Remember, it is the last time you will ever hear from me, so think it over. I have had a most happy life and I want each one of you to have a happy life too.

I believe that God put us in this jolly world to be happy and enjoy life. Happiness does not come from being rich, nor merely being successful in your career, nor by self-indulgence. One step towards happiness is to make yourself healthy and strong while you are a boy, so that you can be useful and so you can enjoy life when you are a man.

Nature study will show you how full of beautiful and wonderful things God has made the world for you to enjoy. Be contented with what you have got and make the best of it. Look on the bright side of things instead of the gloomy one.

But the real way to get happiness is by giving out happiness to other people. Try and leave this world a little better than you found it and when your turn comes to die, you can die happy in feeling that at any rate you have not wasted your time but have done your best. ‘Be Prepared’ in this way, to live happy and to die happy – stick to your Scout Promise always – even after you have ceased to be a boy – and God help you to do it.

Your friend,

 

 

BOOKS BY BADEN-POWELL

“Books are like a gigantic treasure chest stuffed full of gold and precious stones and pieces of eight – and a bit of nonsense too. It is tremendous fun exploring the chest and deciding for yourself what is valuable and what isn’t, what you want to keep and what you don’t like.”

–Baden-Powell, Wolf Cub Handbook (15th Edition), p. 162

  • Aids To Scoutmastership, 1919
  • Definitive “World Brotherhood Edition,” edited by William Hillcourt, 1944
  • Scouting Games, 1910
  • Reconnaisance and Scouting, 1884
  • Cavalry Instruction, 1885
  • Pigsticking or Hoghunting, 1889,
  • Re-issue: Pig-Sticking or Hog-Hunting,1923
  • The Downfall of Prempeh, 1896
  • The Matabele Campaign, 1897
  • Aids To Scouting for N.C.O.’s and Men, 1899
  • Sport In War, 1900
  • Notes and Instructions For The South African Constabulary, 1901
  • Sketches In Mafeking and East Africa, 1901
  • Ambidexterity; by John Jackson and Baden-Powell, 1905
  • Scouting For Boys, 1908  Originally issued in six parts.
  • Scouting for Boys, complete edition, 1911
  • Canadian edition: The Canadian Boy Scout, 1923
  • Indian edition: Scouting for Boys in India, 1932 Boys’ edition
  • (1942 Memorial edition)
  • (1946 Definitive “World Brotherhood Edition”, edited by William Hillcourt)
  • Yarns For Boy Scouts, 1909
  • Handbook For Girl Guides, 1912 collaboration with Agnes Baden-Powell
  • Boy Scouts Beyond The Sea: My World Tour, 1913
  • Quick Training For War, 1914
  • Indian Memories, 1915
  • My Adventures As A Spy, 1915, 1936
  • Re-issue: The Adventures of a Spy, 1924
  • Young Knights of the Empire, 1916
  • The Wolf Cub’s Handbook. 1916
  • Girl Guiding, 1918
  • What Scouts Can Do, 1921
  • An Old Wolf’s Favourites, 1921
  • Rovering To Success, 1922
  • Life’s Snags and How To Meet Them, 1927
  • Scouting And Youth Movements, 1929
  • Lessons From the Varsity of Life, 1933
  • Adventures and Accidents, 1934
  • Scouting Round The World, 1935
  • Adventuring To Manhood, 1936
  • African Adventures, 1937
  • Birds and Beasts of Africa, 1938
  • Paddle Your Own Canoe, 1939
  • More Sketches of Kenya, 1940
  • Adventuring With Baden-Powell by The Chief, 1956

COLLECTIONS OF BADEN-POWELL ARTICLES

  • 1923 Blazing the Trail. Being wise saws and modern instances from the works of the Chief Scout. Collected by Laura Holt
  • 1941 B-P’s Outlook. Selections from The Scouter.
  • 1956 Adventuring with Baden-Powell. Selected yarns and articles

MINOR BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS BY BADEN-POWELL

  • 1883 On Vedette: An Easy Aide-Memoire
  • 1896 The Native Levy in the Ashanti Expedition
  • 1897 The Campaign in Rhodesia
  • 1907 Boy Scouts Scheme–Boy Scouts: A Suggestion-Summary of Scheme-A Successful Trial
  • 1909 A Trip to Sunshine
  • 1911 Sea Scouting for Boys
  • 1911 Workers or Shirkers-Boy Scouts in Connection with National Training and National Service
  • 1915 Marksmanship for Boys
  • 1917 Scouting Towards Reconstruction The Cub Book
  • 1920 Steps to Girl Guiding Brownies and Bluebirds
  • 1921 The Scout’s First Book Scouting in Education
  • 1927 South African Tour 1926-27
  • 1929 Aims, Methods and Needs
  • 1932 Rover Scouts
  • 1936 The Great Trek of the Early Scouts of South Africa
  • 1939 About Those Boy Scouts

Links to some of these publications.

Bibliography list adapted from Baden-Powell by William Hillcourt

BOOKS ABOUT BADEN-POWELL

  • The Story of Baden-Powell – ‘The Wolf That Never Sleeps’, by Harold Begbie, 1900
  • Baden-Powell the Hero of Mafeking by W. Francis Aitken published 1900
  • The Chief Scout by by W. Francis Aitken published 1910
  • The Piper of Pax, by Eileen K. Wade, 1924
  • The Chief Scout, by W.J.Batchelder, between 1924 & 1929
  • Lessons from the Varsity of Life, by Lord Baden-Powell, 1933
  • Lessons of a Lifetime, by Lord Baden-Powell, 1933
  • Baden-Powell, by R.H. Kiernan, 1939
  • Baden-Powell, by E.E.Reynolds, 1942
  • Baden-Powell, by Eileen K.Wade, 1943
  • B-P, by E.E.Reynolds, 1943
  • The Baden-Powell Story, by Geoffrey Bond, 1955
  • Baden-Powell–The Two Lives of a Hero, by William Hillcourt (Green Bar Bill) with Olave Baden-Powell 1964 & 1994
  • Baden-Powell, Chief Scout of The World, by Wyatt Blassingame, 1966.
  • Scouting With Baden-Powell, by Russell Freedman, Holiday House: New York, 1967
  • The Gilwell Story, by Rex Hazlewood, 1969.
  • Olave Baden-Powell: the Authorized Biography of the World Chief Guide, by Eileen K. Wade, 1971.
  • The World Chief Guide – Lady Baden-Powell, by Eileen K. Wade, 1972.
  • The Founding Of The Boy Scouts As Seen Through The Letters Of  Lord Baden-Powell; October 1907-October 1908. Edited by Paul C. Richards, 1973.
  • Petticoat in Mafeking, by John F. Midgley, 1974.
  • The Chief : the Life story of Robert Baden-Powell by Eileen K. Wade, 1975.
  • Baden-Powell, The Man Who Lived Twice, by Mary Drewery, 1975
  • The Brownsea Story, by William Hillcourt, 1982.
  • The Character Factory: Baden-Powell and the Orifins of the Boy Scout Movement, by Michael Rosenthal, 1986.
  • Mowgli’s Sons : Kipling and Baden-Powell’s Scouts, by Hugh Brogan, 1987.
  • Baden-Powell, by Pauline York Brower, 1989 (A Picture Book).
  • Baden-Powell, by Tim Jeal, 1989.
  • Robert Baden-Powell, by Julia Courtney, 1990.
  • The Boy-Man, by Tim Jeal, 1990.
  • The Scout’s Life of Baden-Powell, by W.J. Batchelder and David Balfour
  • Be Prepared – The Story of Baden-Powell, by W.J. Batchelder and Balfour
  • Twenty-seven Years With Baden-Powell, by Eileen K. Wade

Source: //platinumscout.tripod.com/b-p.html

N2-72-18 Patch
N2-72-17 Patch
Course Recruiting Patch
2016 Wood Badge Course
2015 Wood Badge Course
2014 Wood Badge Course
2013 Wood Badge Course
2012 Wood Badge Course
2011 Wood Badge Course
2011 W/E 2 Wood Badge Course PinWeekend 2 Special Patch/Pin
2010 Wood Badge Course
2009 Wood Badge Course
2008 Wood Badge Course
2007 Wood Badge Course
2006 Wood Badge Course
2005 Wood Badge Course
2003 Wood Badge Course
2002 Wood Badge Course
2001 Wood Badge Course
1997 NE-II-90
Wood Badge 1999
 1993 NE-I-177

 

CYC Wood Badge Jacket Patch

 

Wood Badge Art - 4 Panels

Below is a listing of KNOWN Wood Badge Courses that relate to our Council, either by location or Course Director. This list is incomplete. Any help in filling in the blanks, or identifying other courses and Course Directors would be very welcome.

Also included is a listing of NYLT Courses where the Scoutmaster was recognized with a fourth bead.

 

Course Director Course # Year Location
Bob Lincavicks N2 – 72 – 20 2020 Camp Sequassen
Dave Barrett N2 – 72 – 19 2019 Camp Sequassen
Kathy Dilks N2 – 72 – 19 – 1Y 2019 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Erik Zars N2 – 72 – 18 – 1Y 2018 Camp Pomperaug
Andrea Ulery N2 – 72 – 18 2018 Deer Lake/Hoyt SR
Dave Shuford N2 – 72 – 17 2017 Camp Sequassen
Ray Pflomm N2 – 72 – 16 2016 Camp Pomperaug
Jeff Guzauckas N2 – 72 – 16 – 1Y 2016 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Ray Spagnuolo N2 – 72 – 15 2015 Camp Pomp./Deer Lake
Caroline Griffin N2 – 72 – 14 – 1Y 2014 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Doug Heim N2 – 72 – 14 2014 Camp Sequassen
Caroline Griffin N2 – 72 – 13 2013 Camp Pomperaug
Wade Anderson N2 – 72 – 13 – 1Y 2013 Deer Lake Scout Res.
John Neary N2 – 72 – 12 2012 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Dave Elkodsi N2 – 72 – 11 – 1Y 2011 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Jay Lubin N2 – 72 – 11 2011 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Roger Poggio NE – II – 191 2010 Camp Sequassen
Ray Moncevicius NE – II – 188 2009 Camp Sequassen
Mike Abrahamson NE-II-72-09-NYLT1 2009 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Bill Fromm NE – II – 184 2008 Camp Sequassen
Eric Larson NE – II – 173 2007 Camp Sequassen
Mark Clark NE – II – 163 2006 Camp Sequassen
Bruce Harvey NE – II – 143 2005 Camp Sequassen
Charlie Blanchette NE – II – 134 2003 Camp Sequassen
Mary Saracino NE – II – 127 2002 Camp Sequassen
Jay Huggins NE – II – 111 2001 Camp Sequassen
Doug Machin NE – III – 145 1999 Camp Sequassen
Gary Dingus NE – II – 90 1997 Camp Seton
John Farley NE – II – 84 1996 Camp Sequassen
Vin Nolan NE – CS – 48 1994 Camp Workcoeman
Nick Cianciola NE – I – 167 1993 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Dick Odell NE – III – 111 1991 Camp Pomperaug
Peter Newcomb NE – I – 147 1990 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Betty Hilker NE – CS – 32 1990 Heritage Scout Res.
Claire Dibble NE – CS – 22 1988 Heritage Scout Res.
Don Rowland NE – I – 129 1987 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Dick Odell NE – I – 128 1987 Camp Pomperaug
Mort Johnson NE – I – 101 1983 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Dr. Al Adler, PhD NE – I – 87 1981 Deer Lake Scout Res.
David J. Griffiths NE – I – 77 1980 Camp Pomperaug
C. Robert Small NE – I – 71 1979 Chesterfield Scout Res.
Tom Dolan NE – I – 70 1979 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Tim Daley NE – I – 62 1978 Camp Pomperaug
Dag Pfeiffer NE – I – 56 1977 Camp Sequassen
Dag Pfeiffer NE – III – 19 1976 Camp Sequassen
Leo Lemoine NE – I – 23 1975 Camp Mauwehu
Al Halliwell NE – I – 4 1973 Camp Sequassen
Carl A. J? 310 1967 Camp Sequassen
D. A. Barnett 287 1966 Camp Sequassen
??? ???? 1962 Deer Lake Scout Res.
# Note: Course Number Ending with “Y” Denotes NYLT Course

Last Updated August 18, 2018

 

A History of Wood Badge in the United States

Wood Badge has a long and storied history since the first course was held at Gilwell Park in July 1919. Yet, it took Wood Badge Ax and Loguntil 1936 for Wood Badge to first come to the United States. A Rover Scout Wood Badge course was held at Schiff Scout Reservation May 12-20, 1936, followed by a Scout Wood Badge Course between May 24-June 3, 1936. Both courses were run by the Camp Chief of Gilwell Park, John Skinner Wilson. William “Green Bar Bill” Hillcourt, assistant director of Boys’ Life magazine attended the Rover Scout course and served as the Senior Patrol Leader (“dog’s-body” in British terms) for the Boy Scout Wood Badge course. While these two experimental courses were a success, World War II intervened, and Wood Badge did not return to the US until 1948, after the retirement of the first Chief Scout Executive, James E. West.

Courses were originally designed to run at Schiff Scout Reservation and Philmont. Under this US version of Wood Badge, the Patrol Method was heavily stressed. The patrol names picked were birds and animals (Critters) found in every state in the Union: Eagle, Bob White, Fox, and Beaver. The first American Wood Badge course was July 31-August 8, 1948. The course assembled 29 men plus staff from 12 states (Connecticut was not one of the states represented). The Scoutmaster was “Green Bar Bill” Hillcourt. The second course was held at Philmont, October 2-10, 1948. “Green Bar Bill” was once again Scoutmaster, with 35 participants.

Between 1948 and 1958, nearly 5,000 men had taken a Wood Badge course. Early courses were conducted exclusively by the National Volunteer Training Service; the first course conducted by a local council was in 1953 in Cincinnati. Week long courses were the rule until 1974, when weekend courses were authorized. Wood Badge was an exclusive male domain until 1976, when women scouters were welcomed into Wood Badge.

Explorer Wood Badge was first held in 1951; Cub Scout Trainer Wood Badge was first held in 1976. Over the years, there were Walking Wood Badge courses, Rafting Wood Badge courses, and Canoe Wood Badge courses.

Through 1958, no Wood Badge courses had been held in Connecticut, according to the BSA National Council ^. Chief Bogan ^^ made no mention of Wood Badge in his comprehensive book so we assume no Wood Badge courses were held by Quinnipiac Council through 1963. However, the Chief did indicate that in 1952, Mountain Man Training began, stating that Mountain Man was “…patterned after the British Wood Badge training…” The course director appeared to be Assistant Scout Executive Hermon F. Newcomb. Apparently the Mountain Man program continued annually thereafter.

^ General Source: A History of Wood Badge in the United States (Links below); BSA Publication 3164, 1990 Printing

^^ No Larger Fields: The History of a Boy Scout Council 1910-1963; by Samuel D. Bogan, © 1966, Quinnipiac Council BSA

Wood Badge Links of Interest

Baden Powell

A Brief History of Baden-Powell

The name Baden-Powell is known and respected throughout the world as that of a man who, in his 83 years, devoted himself to the service of his country and his fellow men in two separate and complete lives, one as a soldier fighting for his country, and the other as a worker for peace through the brotherhood of the Scout Movement.

Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell was born at 6 Stanhope Street (now 11 Stanhope Terrace), Paddington, London on February 22, 1857. He was the sixth son and the eighth of ten children of the Reverend Baden-Powell, a Professor at Oxford University. The names Robert Stephenson were those of his Godfather, the son of George Stephenson, the railway pioneer.

His father died when B.-P. was only three years old and the family were left none too well off. B.-P. was given his first lessons by his mother and later attended Rose Hill School, Tunbridge Wells, where he BPgained a scholarship for admittance to Charterhouse School. Charterhouse School was in London when B.-P. first attended but whilst he was there it moved to Godalming, Surrey, a factor which had great influence in his later life. He was always eager to learn new skills. He played the piano and fiddle. He acted – and acted the clown too at times. He practiced bricklaying, and it was whilst a scholar at Charter house that he began to exploit his interest in the arts of Scouting and woodcraft.

Unofficially, in the woods around the school, B.-P. would stalk his Masters as well as catch and cook rabbits, being careful not to let the tell-tale smoke give his position away. His holidays were not wasted either. With his brothers he was always in search of adventure. One holiday they made a yachting expedition around the south coast of England. On another, they traced the Thames to its source by canoe. In all this, Baden-Powell was learning the arts and crafts which were to prove so useful to him professionally. B.-P. was certainly not a ‘swot’ at school, as his end of term reports revealed. One records: ‘Mathematics – has to all intents given up the study’, and another:

‘French – could do well but has become very lazy, often sleeps in school’. Nevertheless, he gained second place for cavalry in open examination for the Army and was commissioned straight into the 13th Hussars, bypassing the officer training establishments, and subsequently became their Honorary Colonel for 30 years. His Army career was outstanding from the start. With the 13th Hussars he served in India, Afghanistan and South Africa and was mentioned in dispatches for his work in Zululand. There followed three years service in Malta as Assistant Military Secretary and then he went to Ashanti, Africa, to lead the campaign against Prempeh. Success led to his being promoted to command the 5th Dragoon Guards in 1897, at the age of 40. It was to the 5th Dragoon Guards that B.-P. gave his first training in Scouting and awarded soldiers reaching certain standards a badge based on the north point of the compass. Today’s Scout Membership badge is very similar.

In 1899 came Mafeking, the most notable episode in his outstanding military career, by which he became a Major-General at the age of only 43. B.-P. became famous and the hero of every boy, although he always minimized his own part and the value of his inspiring leadership. By using boys for responsible jobs during the siege, he learned the good response youth give to a challenge. During the 217 day siege, B.-P.’s book Aids to Scouting was published and reached a far wider readership than the military one for which it was intended.  Following Mafeking, B.-P. was given the task of organizing the South African Constabulary and it was not until 1903 that he returned to England as Inspector General of Cavalry and found that his book, Aids to Scouting was being used by youth leaders and teachers all over the country. He spoke at meetings and rallies and whilst at a Boys’ Brigade gathering he was asked by its Founder, Sir William Smith, to work out a scheme for giving greater variety in the training of boys in good citizenship.

The Beginnings of the Movement

B.P. set to work rewriting Aids to Scouting, this time for a younger readership. In 1907 he held an experimental camp on Brownsea Island, Poole, Dorset, to try out his ideas. He brought together 22 boys, some from public schools and some from working class homes, and put them into camp under his leadership. The whole world now knows the results of that camp.

Scouting for Boys

Scouting for Boys was published in 1908 in six fortnightly parts at 4d a copy. Sales of the book were tremendous. Boys formed themselves into Scout Patrols to try out ideas. What had been intended as a training aid for existing organizations became the handbook of a new and, ultimately worldwide Movement. B.-P.’s great understanding of boys obviously touched something fundamental in the youth of this and other countries.

‘Scouting for Boys’ has since been translated into many different languages and dialects.

Without fuss, without ceremony and completely spontaneously, boys began to form Scout Troops all over the country. In September 1908, B.P. had set up an office to deal with the large number of enquiries which were pouring in concerning the Movement.

There is no need to describe the way in which Scouting spread throughout the British Commonwealth and to other countries until it was established in practically all parts of the free world. Even those countries where Scouting as we know it is not allowed to exist readily, admit that they used its methods for their own youth training.

As Inspector-General of Cavalry, B.P. considered that he had reached the pinnacle of his career. The baton of Field Marshal was within his grasp but he retired from the Army in 1910 at the age of 53, on the advice of His Majesty King Edward VII, who suggested that he would do more valuable service for his country within the Boy Scout Movement (now Scout Movement) than anyone could hope to do as a soldier!

So all his enthusiasm and energy was now directed to the development of Scouting and its sister Movement, Guiding. He traveled to all parts of the world, wherever he was most needed, to encourage their growth and give them the inspiration that he alone could give.

In 1912, he married Olave Soames who was his constant help and companion in all this work and by whom he had three children (Peter, Heather and Betty). Olave, Lady Baden-Powell, until she died in 1977, was known throughout the world as World Chief Guide.

Chief Scout of the World

The first international Scout Jamboree took place at Olympia, London in 1920. At its closing scene, B.-P. was unanimously acclaimed as Chief Scout of the World. Successive international gatherings, whether of Scouts or Rovers (now called Venture Scouts) or of Scouters, proved that this was not an honorary title, but that he was truly regarded by them all as their Chief. The shouts that heralded his arrival, and the silence that fell when he raised his hand, proved beyond any doubt that he had captured the hearts and imaginations of his followers in whatever country they owed allegiance.

At the 3rd World Jamboree, held in Arrowe Park, Birkenhead, to celebrate the 21st Anniversary of the publication of Scouting for Boys, the Prince of Wales announced that B.P. had been created a Peer. He took the title of Lord Baden-Powell of Gilwell – Gilwell Park being the International Training Centre for Scout Leaders.

Scouting was not B.P.’s only interest, for excelled at pig-sticking and fishing, and favored polo and big game hunting. He was also a very good black & white and watercolor artist and took an interest in photography and sculpture. In 1907, he exhibited a bust of John Smith, the colonial pioneer, at the Royal Academy.

B.P. wrote no less than 32 books, the earning from which helped to pay for his Scouting travels. As with all his successors, he received no salary as Chief Scout. He received honorary degrees from Edinburgh, Toronto, Montreal, Oxford, Liverpool and Cambridge Universities. He also received Freedoms of the cities of London, Guildford, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Bangor, Cardiff, Hawick, Kingston-on- Thames, Poole, Blandford, Canterbury and Pontefract, and of other cities in various parts of the world. In addition, 28 Foreign Orders and decorations and 19 Foreign Scout Awards were bestowed upon him. Every minute of B.-P.’s life was ‘sixty seconds worth of distance run’. Each new adventure was the subject for a book. Every happy incident or thought, every fine landscape might be the subject for a sketch. In 1938, suffering from ill-health, B.-P. returned to Africa, which had meant so much in his life, to live in semi-retirement in Nyeri, Kenya. Even here he found it difficult to curb his energies – he still produced many books and sketches.

Baden Powell Gravestone - Gone Home

On January 8, 1941, Baden-Powell died. He was 83 years of age. He is buried in a simple grave at Nyeri within sight of Mount Kenya. On his headstone are the words, ‘Robert Baden-Powell, Chief Scout of the World’ surmounted by the Boy Scout and Girl Guide Badges. His memory remains for all time in the hearts of millions of men and women, boys and girls.

It is up to those who are, or have been, Scouts or Guides to see that the two Movements he so firmly established continue for all time as living memorials to their Founder.

Baden-Powell’s Last Message

Towards the end of his life, although still in comparatively good health, he prepared a farewell message to his Scouts for publication after his death. It read:

 

Dear Scouts – if you have ever seen the play ‘Peter Pan’ you will remember how the pirate chief was always making his dying speech because he was afraid that possible, when the time came for him to die, he might not have time to get it off his chest. It is much the same with me, and so, although I am not at this moment dying, I shall be doing so one of these days and I want to send you a parting word of goodbye.Remember, it is the last time you will ever hear from me, so think it over. I have had a most happy life and I want each one of you to have a happy life too.

I believe that God put us in this jolly world to be happy and enjoy life. Happiness does not come from being rich, nor merely being successful in your career, nor by self-indulgence. One step towards happiness is to make yourself healthy and strong while you are a boy, so that you can be useful and so you can enjoy life when you are a man.

Nature study will show you how full of beautiful and wonderful things God has made the world for you to enjoy. Be contented with what you have got and make the best of it. Look on the bright side of things instead of the gloomy one.

But the real way to get happiness is by giving out happiness to other people. Try and leave this world a little better than you found it and when your turn comes to die, you can die happy in feeling that at any rate you have not wasted your time but have done your best. ‘Be Prepared’ in this way, to live happy and to die happy – stick to your Scout Promise always – even after you have ceased to be a boy – and God help you to do it.

Your friend,

 

 

BOOKS BY BADEN-POWELL

“Books are like a gigantic treasure chest stuffed full of gold and precious stones and pieces of eight – and a bit of nonsense too. It is tremendous fun exploring the chest and deciding for yourself what is valuable and what isn’t, what you want to keep and what you don’t like.”

–Baden-Powell, Wolf Cub Handbook (15th Edition), p. 162

  • Aids To Scoutmastership, 1919
  • Definitive “World Brotherhood Edition,” edited by William Hillcourt, 1944
  • Scouting Games, 1910
  • Reconnaisance and Scouting, 1884
  • Cavalry Instruction, 1885
  • Pigsticking or Hoghunting, 1889,
  • Re-issue: Pig-Sticking or Hog-Hunting,1923
  • The Downfall of Prempeh, 1896
  • The Matabele Campaign, 1897
  • Aids To Scouting for N.C.O.’s and Men, 1899
  • Sport In War, 1900
  • Notes and Instructions For The South African Constabulary, 1901
  • Sketches In Mafeking and East Africa, 1901
  • Ambidexterity; by John Jackson and Baden-Powell, 1905
  • Scouting For Boys, 1908  Originally issued in six parts.
  • Scouting for Boys, complete edition, 1911
  • Canadian edition: The Canadian Boy Scout, 1923
  • Indian edition: Scouting for Boys in India, 1932 Boys’ edition
  • (1942 Memorial edition)
  • (1946 Definitive “World Brotherhood Edition”, edited by William Hillcourt)
  • Yarns For Boy Scouts, 1909
  • Handbook For Girl Guides, 1912 collaboration with Agnes Baden-Powell
  • Boy Scouts Beyond The Sea: My World Tour, 1913
  • Quick Training For War, 1914
  • Indian Memories, 1915
  • My Adventures As A Spy, 1915, 1936
  • Re-issue: The Adventures of a Spy, 1924
  • Young Knights of the Empire, 1916
  • The Wolf Cub’s Handbook. 1916
  • Girl Guiding, 1918
  • What Scouts Can Do, 1921
  • An Old Wolf’s Favourites, 1921
  • Rovering To Success, 1922
  • Life’s Snags and How To Meet Them, 1927
  • Scouting And Youth Movements, 1929
  • Lessons From the Varsity of Life, 1933
  • Adventures and Accidents, 1934
  • Scouting Round The World, 1935
  • Adventuring To Manhood, 1936
  • African Adventures, 1937
  • Birds and Beasts of Africa, 1938
  • Paddle Your Own Canoe, 1939
  • More Sketches of Kenya, 1940
  • Adventuring With Baden-Powell by The Chief, 1956

COLLECTIONS OF BADEN-POWELL ARTICLES

  • 1923 Blazing the Trail. Being wise saws and modern instances from the works of the Chief Scout. Collected by Laura Holt
  • 1941 B-P’s Outlook. Selections from The Scouter.
  • 1956 Adventuring with Baden-Powell. Selected yarns and articles

MINOR BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS BY BADEN-POWELL

  • 1883 On Vedette: An Easy Aide-Memoire
  • 1896 The Native Levy in the Ashanti Expedition
  • 1897 The Campaign in Rhodesia
  • 1907 Boy Scouts Scheme–Boy Scouts: A Suggestion-Summary of Scheme-A Successful Trial
  • 1909 A Trip to Sunshine
  • 1911 Sea Scouting for Boys
  • 1911 Workers or Shirkers-Boy Scouts in Connection with National Training and National Service
  • 1915 Marksmanship for Boys
  • 1917 Scouting Towards Reconstruction The Cub Book
  • 1920 Steps to Girl Guiding Brownies and Bluebirds
  • 1921 The Scout’s First Book Scouting in Education
  • 1927 South African Tour 1926-27
  • 1929 Aims, Methods and Needs
  • 1932 Rover Scouts
  • 1936 The Great Trek of the Early Scouts of South Africa
  • 1939 About Those Boy Scouts

Links to some of these publications.

Bibliography list adapted from Baden-Powell by William Hillcourt

BOOKS ABOUT BADEN-POWELL

  • The Story of Baden-Powell – ‘The Wolf That Never Sleeps’, by Harold Begbie, 1900
  • Baden-Powell the Hero of Mafeking by W. Francis Aitken published 1900
  • The Chief Scout by by W. Francis Aitken published 1910
  • The Piper of Pax, by Eileen K. Wade, 1924
  • The Chief Scout, by W.J.Batchelder, between 1924 & 1929
  • Lessons from the Varsity of Life, by Lord Baden-Powell, 1933
  • Lessons of a Lifetime, by Lord Baden-Powell, 1933
  • Baden-Powell, by R.H. Kiernan, 1939
  • Baden-Powell, by E.E.Reynolds, 1942
  • Baden-Powell, by Eileen K.Wade, 1943
  • B-P, by E.E.Reynolds, 1943
  • The Baden-Powell Story, by Geoffrey Bond, 1955
  • Baden-Powell–The Two Lives of a Hero, by William Hillcourt (Green Bar Bill) with Olave Baden-Powell 1964 & 1994
  • Baden-Powell, Chief Scout of The World, by Wyatt Blassingame, 1966.
  • Scouting With Baden-Powell, by Russell Freedman, Holiday House: New York, 1967
  • The Gilwell Story, by Rex Hazlewood, 1969.
  • Olave Baden-Powell: the Authorized Biography of the World Chief Guide, by Eileen K. Wade, 1971.
  • The World Chief Guide – Lady Baden-Powell, by Eileen K. Wade, 1972.
  • The Founding Of The Boy Scouts As Seen Through The Letters Of  Lord Baden-Powell; October 1907-October 1908. Edited by Paul C. Richards, 1973.
  • Petticoat in Mafeking, by John F. Midgley, 1974.
  • The Chief : the Life story of Robert Baden-Powell by Eileen K. Wade, 1975.
  • Baden-Powell, The Man Who Lived Twice, by Mary Drewery, 1975
  • The Brownsea Story, by William Hillcourt, 1982.
  • The Character Factory: Baden-Powell and the Orifins of the Boy Scout Movement, by Michael Rosenthal, 1986.
  • Mowgli’s Sons : Kipling and Baden-Powell’s Scouts, by Hugh Brogan, 1987.
  • Baden-Powell, by Pauline York Brower, 1989 (A Picture Book).
  • Baden-Powell, by Tim Jeal, 1989.
  • Robert Baden-Powell, by Julia Courtney, 1990.
  • The Boy-Man, by Tim Jeal, 1990.
  • The Scout’s Life of Baden-Powell, by W.J. Batchelder and David Balfour
  • Be Prepared – The Story of Baden-Powell, by W.J. Batchelder and Balfour
  • Twenty-seven Years With Baden-Powell, by Eileen K. Wade

Source: //platinumscout.tripod.com/b-p.html

Course Patches
N2-72-18 Patch
N2-72-17 Patch
Course Recruiting Patch
2016 Wood Badge Course
2015 Wood Badge Course
2014 Wood Badge Course
2013 Wood Badge Course
2012 Wood Badge Course
2011 Wood Badge Course
2011 W/E 2 Wood Badge Course PinWeekend 2 Special Patch/Pin
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2007 Wood Badge Course
2006 Wood Badge Course
2005 Wood Badge Course
2003 Wood Badge Course
2002 Wood Badge Course
2001 Wood Badge Course
1997 NE-II-90
Wood Badge 1999
 1993 NE-I-177

 

CYC Wood Badge Jacket Patch

 

Wood Badge Art - 4 Panels

Wood Badge Course History

Below is a listing of KNOWN Wood Badge Courses that relate to our Council, either by location or Course Director. This list is incomplete. Any help in filling in the blanks, or identifying other courses and Course Directors would be very welcome.

Also included is a listing of NYLT Courses where the Scoutmaster was recognized with a fourth bead.

 

Course Director Course # Year Location
Bob Lincavicks N2 – 72 – 20 2020 Camp Sequassen
Dave Barrett N2 – 72 – 19 2019 Camp Sequassen
Kathy Dilks N2 – 72 – 19 – 1Y 2019 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Erik Zars N2 – 72 – 18 – 1Y 2018 Camp Pomperaug
Andrea Ulery N2 – 72 – 18 2018 Deer Lake/Hoyt SR
Dave Shuford N2 – 72 – 17 2017 Camp Sequassen
Ray Pflomm N2 – 72 – 16 2016 Camp Pomperaug
Jeff Guzauckas N2 – 72 – 16 – 1Y 2016 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Ray Spagnuolo N2 – 72 – 15 2015 Camp Pomp./Deer Lake
Caroline Griffin N2 – 72 – 14 – 1Y 2014 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Doug Heim N2 – 72 – 14 2014 Camp Sequassen
Caroline Griffin N2 – 72 – 13 2013 Camp Pomperaug
Wade Anderson N2 – 72 – 13 – 1Y 2013 Deer Lake Scout Res.
John Neary N2 – 72 – 12 2012 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Dave Elkodsi N2 – 72 – 11 – 1Y 2011 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Jay Lubin N2 – 72 – 11 2011 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Roger Poggio NE – II – 191 2010 Camp Sequassen
Ray Moncevicius NE – II – 188 2009 Camp Sequassen
Mike Abrahamson NE-II-72-09-NYLT1 2009 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Bill Fromm NE – II – 184 2008 Camp Sequassen
Eric Larson NE – II – 173 2007 Camp Sequassen
Mark Clark NE – II – 163 2006 Camp Sequassen
Bruce Harvey NE – II – 143 2005 Camp Sequassen
Charlie Blanchette NE – II – 134 2003 Camp Sequassen
Mary Saracino NE – II – 127 2002 Camp Sequassen
Jay Huggins NE – II – 111 2001 Camp Sequassen
Doug Machin NE – III – 145 1999 Camp Sequassen
Gary Dingus NE – II – 90 1997 Camp Seton
John Farley NE – II – 84 1996 Camp Sequassen
Vin Nolan NE – CS – 48 1994 Camp Workcoeman
Nick Cianciola NE – I – 167 1993 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Dick Odell NE – III – 111 1991 Camp Pomperaug
Peter Newcomb NE – I – 147 1990 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Betty Hilker NE – CS – 32 1990 Heritage Scout Res.
Claire Dibble NE – CS – 22 1988 Heritage Scout Res.
Don Rowland NE – I – 129 1987 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Dick Odell NE – I – 128 1987 Camp Pomperaug
Mort Johnson NE – I – 101 1983 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Dr. Al Adler, PhD NE – I – 87 1981 Deer Lake Scout Res.
David J. Griffiths NE – I – 77 1980 Camp Pomperaug
C. Robert Small NE – I – 71 1979 Chesterfield Scout Res.
Tom Dolan NE – I – 70 1979 Deer Lake Scout Res.
Tim Daley NE – I – 62 1978 Camp Pomperaug
Dag Pfeiffer NE – I – 56 1977 Camp Sequassen
Dag Pfeiffer NE – III – 19 1976 Camp Sequassen
Leo Lemoine NE – I – 23 1975 Camp Mauwehu
Al Halliwell NE – I – 4 1973 Camp Sequassen
Carl A. J? 310 1967 Camp Sequassen
D. A. Barnett 287 1966 Camp Sequassen
??? ???? 1962 Deer Lake Scout Res.
# Note: Course Number Ending with “Y” Denotes NYLT Course

Last Updated August 18, 2018

 

A History of Wood Badge in the United States

Wood Badge has a long and storied history since the first course was held at Gilwell Park in July 1919. Yet, it took Wood Badge Ax and Loguntil 1936 for Wood Badge to first come to the United States. A Rover Scout Wood Badge course was held at Schiff Scout Reservation May 12-20, 1936, followed by a Scout Wood Badge Course between May 24-June 3, 1936. Both courses were run by the Camp Chief of Gilwell Park, John Skinner Wilson. William “Green Bar Bill” Hillcourt, assistant director of Boys’ Life magazine attended the Rover Scout course and served as the Senior Patrol Leader (“dog’s-body” in British terms) for the Boy Scout Wood Badge course. While these two experimental courses were a success, World War II intervened, and Wood Badge did not return to the US until 1948, after the retirement of the first Chief Scout Executive, James E. West.

Courses were originally designed to run at Schiff Scout Reservation and Philmont. Under this US version of Wood Badge, the Patrol Method was heavily stressed. The patrol names picked were birds and animals (Critters) found in every state in the Union: Eagle, Bob White, Fox, and Beaver. The first American Wood Badge course was July 31-August 8, 1948. The course assembled 29 men plus staff from 12 states (Connecticut was not one of the states represented). The Scoutmaster was “Green Bar Bill” Hillcourt. The second course was held at Philmont, October 2-10, 1948. “Green Bar Bill” was once again Scoutmaster, with 35 participants.

Between 1948 and 1958, nearly 5,000 men had taken a Wood Badge course. Early courses were conducted exclusively by the National Volunteer Training Service; the first course conducted by a local council was in 1953 in Cincinnati. Week long courses were the rule until 1974, when weekend courses were authorized. Wood Badge was an exclusive male domain until 1976, when women scouters were welcomed into Wood Badge.

Explorer Wood Badge was first held in 1951; Cub Scout Trainer Wood Badge was first held in 1976. Over the years, there were Walking Wood Badge courses, Rafting Wood Badge courses, and Canoe Wood Badge courses.

Through 1958, no Wood Badge courses had been held in Connecticut, according to the BSA National Council ^. Chief Bogan ^^ made no mention of Wood Badge in his comprehensive book so we assume no Wood Badge courses were held by Quinnipiac Council through 1963. However, the Chief did indicate that in 1952, Mountain Man Training began, stating that Mountain Man was “…patterned after the British Wood Badge training…” The course director appeared to be Assistant Scout Executive Hermon F. Newcomb. Apparently the Mountain Man program continued annually thereafter.

^ General Source: A History of Wood Badge in the United States (Links below); BSA Publication 3164, 1990 Printing

^^ No Larger Fields: The History of a Boy Scout Council 1910-1963; by Samuel D. Bogan, © 1966, Quinnipiac Council BSA

Wood Badge Links of Interest

Fellowship Dinner 11/03/19